microWAT Microcomputer

Dublin Core

Title

microWAT Microcomputer

Subject

hardware: microcomputer

Description

The microWAT microcomputer project was initiated by the 1979 study conducted at the University of Waterloo, on possible use of microcomputers for academic applications (for more information, see the reference below). The computer was designed by the University of Waterloo and Jerry Krist -- president of Northern Digital Ltd. of Waterloo, Ontario, and subsequently manufactured by Northern Digital.

The microWAT was a small CPU unit that required a separate keyboard, display, and external storage to for a computer system. Some  microWATs were installed inside dumb terminals (usually Volker Craig terminals) converting such terminals into desktop computers. The computer was built around the Motorola 6809 microprocessor and all its hardware was deposited on several printed circuit boards including the the CPU, I/O, ROM, and RAM boards. One additional board (a "key" card) was special as it  had ROMs containing a key apparently needed to activate the system.

The microWATs were used, among other places, at the University of Waterloo for academic teaching and research.

References:
  • D.D. Cowan and J.W. Graham, Waterloo Microcomputer Systems for the 1980's, Proceedings of the ACM '82, pp. 13–17 (1982).
  • R.L. Hughson, Alternations in the oxygen deficit-oxygen debt relationship with beta-adrenergic receptor blockade in man", J. Physiol.  349, pp. 375-387 (1984).

Creator

Developed by the University of Waterloo, Manufactured by Northern Digital Ltd.

Date

1980

Format

Hardware

Type

Hardware

Identifier

H.25

Coverage

1980-1982[?]

Contribution Form

Online Submission

No

Files

micwatb.jpg
micwat.jpg

Citation

Developed by the University of Waterloo, Manufactured by Northern Digital Ltd., “microWAT Microcomputer,” York University Computer Museum Canada, accessed December 3, 2021, https://museum.eecs.yorku.ca/items/show/47.

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